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contact: Judy Stanton
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hamilton jordan awardeeGeorgia Leaders Work To Improve Cancer Control

ATLANTA (GA) – More than 35,000 cases of cancer will be diagnosed in Georgia this year – about 97 cases per day. Unfortunately, more than 14,950 Georgians are projected to die from the disease as well. With cancer serving as the second leading cause of death in Georgia, actions must be taken to reduce incidence rates, screen and detect the disease earlier and ensure healthcare providers meet or exceed national standards of cancer care. Diverse groups including the Georgia Department of Human Resources, Division of Public Health have collaborated with oncologists, cancer survivors and others statewide to revise Georgia’s Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan and tackle this issue head on.
“We recently met with oncology experts across the state to develop an updated roadmap for cancer control in Georgia over the next five years,” said Dr. Stuart Brown, Director of the Division of Public Health. “Based on collaborative input and using the best scientific evidence, we identified 16 goals with specific objectives to help us achieve comprehensive cancer control.”
The goals fall into five categories across the spectrum of cancer care. The categories include:

  1. Prevention
  2. Early detection and screening
  3. Cancer diagnosis and staging
  4. Treatment and palliation and
  5. Data and metrics.


The prevention category focuses on the nearly two-thirds of cancer deaths that can be linked to modifiable risk factors such as tobacco use, diet, obesity and lack of physical activity. This category seeks to decrease tobacco use among Georgians and reduce the number of overweight and obese children. It will also target lessening the incidence of cervical cancer and the prevalence of the human papilloma virus (HPV).

The burden of cancer can be reduced significantly with appropriate use of mammography, colorectal screening and other early detection examinations. Yet, many Georgians do not have access to these preventive screening options. Removing barriers to cancer screening services is one of the primary focuses of the early detection and screening category. Other targets include increasing participation in recommended screenings for breast, colorectal, cervical and prostate cancers and improving the quality and effectiveness of cancer screening and follow-up services.
The third category, cancer diagnosis and staging, seeks progress in ensuring the timeliness and quality of acquisition, pathology and staging prior to cancer treatment and the uniformity and accuracy of documentation. Physicians, epidemiologists, cancer registrars and health care administrators served on the committee to identify this goal.

In treatment and palliation, the fourth category, ensuring hospital compliance with the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines is key. Other elements under this goal include: increasing the number of Georgians involved in cancer clinical trials and having palliative care available for a large proportion of cancer patients from the time of diagnosis.
The fifth and final category, data and metrics, will improve providers’ knowledge and use of available public health data related to cancer. The committee suggests establishing ongoing and collaborative processes for addressing cancer data and metrics. The category seeks to also expand and enhance cancer data collection from existing and new sources and implement improved information management tools and technologies.

Changes to Georgia’s Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan is the first step in combating cancer in the state. The Coalition’s State Cancer Summit will meet with others involved with cancer care in Georgia on January 14-15, 2008 to discuss collaboration details for implementation of the plan.

Funding and support for Georgia’s plan is provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Leadership was provided by DHR, the Department of Community Health and the Georgia Cancer Coalition. The Georgia Health Policy Center at Georgia State University facilitated the process.

For more information about cancer control in Georgia, please visit: www.georgiacancer.org or call (404) 651- 6611.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

For more information
contact: Judy Stanton
jstanton@georgiacancer.org
Phone: (404) 584-0527

 

ANDREW YOUNGAmbassador Andrew Young honors state cancer community for work on Ceorgia's State Cancer Plan at State Cancer Summit.

January 30, 2008, Atlanta – Ambassador and former Mayor Andrew Young (left), a prostate cancer survivor, shared his survivorship story and paid tribute to volunteers who helped update the State Cancer Plan at the Georgia Cancer Coalition-sponsored State Cancer Summit. Ambassador Young is a board member of the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at Georgia State University; the Health Policy Center facilitated the formulation of the 5-year plan. He is pictured here with Karen Minyard, Ph.D., Director of the Georgia Health Policy Center, and Bill Todd, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Georgia Cancer Coalition.

“For many survivors, like myself, cancer has become a natural part of life; we've learned not to fear it, but how to live with it,” Young says.

Health care providers, caregivers, educators, researchers, administrators and business and civic leaders from across the state attended the Summit to review best practices and strategies for implementing effective statewide cancer programs. Sessions focused on issues addressed in the Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan, including Prevention and Education; Early Detection and Screening; Diagnosis and Staging; Treatment and Palliation; Tobacco Use Prevention; Survivorship; Data and Metrics; and Disparities.

“The Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan is a roadmap, setting priorities for cancer control in Georgia for the next five years. Presentations and facilitated discussion at the Cancer Summit put us on the road to the collaboration and commitment of resources that will be required to implement the plan's goals and objectives,” says Bill Todd. “The revised cancer plan provides Georgia with the greatest opportunity to collaboratively save more lives and achieve measurable and sustainable improvement in cancer prevention, detection and care.”

The Summit was presented by the Georgia Cancer Coalition, with funding from the Georgia Department of Human Resources, the American Cancer Society and Sanofi Aventis.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

For more information
contact: Judy Stanton
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Phone: (404) 584-0527

 

hamilton jordan awardeeDr. Matthew P. Mumber receives Georgia Cancer Coalition's Hamilton Jordan Founder's Award

January 30, 2008, Atlanta – Matthew P. Mumber, M.D., (left) a radiation oncologist from Rome, is the 2008 recipient of the Georgia Cancer Coalition Hamilton Jordan Founder's Award. The award was made at 2008 Georgia Cancer Summit at the Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center.

“Dr. Mumber is a clinician with an incredibly large heart,” says Bill Todd, President and CEO of the Coalition. “He was selected by Coalition staff and partners for his incredible bandwidth of involvement in improving cancer control in the state of Georgia.”

A radiation oncologist at the Harbin Clinic Radiation Oncology Center, Dr. Mumber has been involved in leadership positions with the Georgia Cancer Coalition and its partners for many years. He is a Board Member of the Georgia Center for Oncology Research and Education (Georgia CORE); Chairman of the Northwest Georgia Regional Cancer Coalition; and a member of the Board of Directors of the Georgia Society of Clinical Oncology.

As Physician Executive for the Georgia Cancer Quality Information Exchange in Rome, Dr. Mumber has helped unite health care providers in Rome - including Harbin Clinic, Floyd Medical Center and Redmond Regional Medical Center - in a pilot project whose goal is to develop a statewide evidence-based cancer quality measurement program. He is also involved with the National Cancer Institute's Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP), working through Harbin Clinic's clinical affiliation with St. Joseph's / Candler in Savannah, Georgia, one of the 14 sites nationally participating in this pilot program. If fully implemented, NCCCP will help bring state-of-the-art cancer care to patients in community hospitals across the United States.

Dr. Mumber speaks throughout the country on Integrative Oncology and, in 2006, he published the textbook Integrative Oncology: Principles and Practice, which explores a comprehensive evidence-based approach to cancer care, addressing all individuals involved in the process. He helped found Cancer Navigators, Inc., a non-profit organization offering cancer patients in Floyd, Chattooga, and Polk counties access to nurse navigation, social services, and educational programs that support and augment the clinical care they receive from their healthcare providers.

The Hamilton Jordan Founder's Award was first presented in 2005 to Hamilton Jordan, the former White House Chief of Staff and three-time cancer survivor, whose vision in 1999 helped birth the Georgia Cancer Coalition. Jordan is credited with convincing the state's leadership to commit $500 million in tobacco settlement funds to launch a 10-year effort to improve statewide cancer control. By leveraging that investment to encourage further resource commitment, the total resource commitment may approach a billion dollars.

The award is named in his honor.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

For more information
contact: Judy Stanton
jstanton@georgiacancer.org
Phone: (404) 584-0527

 

hamilton jordan awardeeCancer Town Hall Meeting presents revised State Cancer Plan to Community of Cancer Survivors

March, 2008 (Atlanta, GA) –– Cancer survivors in the community were recently given the opportunity to learn about the newly revised State Cancer Plan at the 2008 Cancer Town Hall Meeting presented by the Cancer Survivor Leadership Council of Georgia and the Georgia Cancer Coalition at the Doubletree Hotel in Buckhead.

Pictured at the event are Toby Sidman, Georgia Breast Cancer Coalition Fund; Angie Patterson, Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of the Georgia Cancer Coalition; keynote speaker Herman Cain, a politician, businessman, radio talk-show host, and cancer survivor; and Rudy Morgan, Executive Director of the Georgia Cancer Foundation.

Cain gave an inspiring story of his survivorship and encouraged other cancer survivors to advocate for themselves; he said, “Become the CEO of your treatment plan.” The program began with an introduction by William J. Todd , President and CEO of the Georgia Cancer Coalition, who, along with Kate Canterbury, Coalition Director of Research Programs, outlined Georgia’s efforts in cancer control. They discussed the statewide effort to revise Georgia’s Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan, a five-year plan that will influence the lives of Georgia citizens living with cancer, their families, and the community at large.

Panelists included Dr. Fadlo Khuri, Associate Director of Clinical and Translational Research at the Winship Cancer Institute at Emory, and a Georgia Cancer Coalition Distinguished Scholar; Nannette Turner, PhD, MPH, Assistant Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Mercer University School of Medicine; and Jennifer Potter, Public Education and Outreach Specialist, Georgia Cancer Center for Excellence, Grady Health System. They discussed efforts being made in the state of Georgia to become a national leader in cancer research; to build a comprehensive cancer center; to strengthen survivorship programs; to help patients navigate through the health care system; and to provide access to care for the underserved.

Betty Castellani, Executive Director of the Cancer Center at Dekalb Medical Center, served as program emcee.

 

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© 2008 Georgia Cancer Coalition & GA Department of Human Resources